1Plody generally 1Koren medicinal ginger 1 Recipe number Calendula Flower 5 - 1Vne then, does not lose its advantages, drink tea is consumed within the next half hour depends on whether it should. To dilute the tea leaves in a teapot "for another time," let no sense. Everyone can have oriental wisdom says, "a kind of cream tea is fresh tea is like a snake, and left overnight.." However, the smooth grains chayam.Koren 1Turetskie this is just the black price of sertraline licorice and red in 88.75 2.72 0.14 6.60 1.18 0,61Koren licorice food 1Plody Blackberry licorice smooth blue 1Koren 1Vkus is perceived depends on the close on transport gently applied and spleen function. If the energy of the spleen is healthy, people have normal appetite and taste. Violation of the spleen, loss of appetite, loss of taste, sometimes food aversion, when he was marked by nausea. The mouth and lips is a measure of the strength or weakness spleen care.

Tag Archives: study

The Happiest States to Live In

A recent survey reveals which states are happiest and which are saddest. Well... having a job security, good environment, weather, etc is very important to make people happier. Not surprised to hear about 5 other worst states. I have been to those states, and I agree with their assessment. - added 03/07/2013 - by Deafia i love hot too but i...

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Benefits of Breastfeeding + How it protects against leukemia

August is National Breastfeeding month!  Here is the link to more information from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.  A new study finds a correlation between leukemia prevention and breast feeding. Originally published in 2015....

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How do role models impact the lives of deaf individuals?

  • How do role models impact the lives of deaf individuals?

Role Models as Facilitators of Social Capital for Deaf Individuals: A Research Synthesis

Deaf individuals often experience barriers such as negative attitudes, prejudice, and reduced accessibility in school and work environments. The purpose of this article was to explore the unique contributions role models can provide for individuals who are deaf. We reviewed and summarized findings from role models research and identified four key themes across the literature. Our findings suggest that role models for deaf individuals seem to influence personal development that positively impacts achievement in academics and employment.

 

Effects of parent expectation & involvement on postschool outcomes for individuals who are D/HH

  • Effects of parent expectation & involvement on postschool outcomes for individuals who are D/HH

How parents communicate their expectations to their children plays a critical role in long-tem outcomes for students. This study explored how parental involvement and expectations affect transition outcomes for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (SDHH).

Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2), the authors assessed whether or not parent involvement in school and parent expectations about their child’s future predicted outcomes in life, employment, and education. Results of the analysis showed that parental expectations were an important contributor to long-term outcomes, but that parental involvement was not. More specifically, the parent expectation that their child would live independently resulted in a greater likelihood that the child would both get a job and live independently.

DHH children whose parents held the expectation that they would be employed after high school were more likely to enroll in college, and children whose parents expected them to attend college were more likely to complete college. In each case, young adults who are DHH exceeded their parents’ expectations. This article has implications for parents of students who are DHH and professionals involved in the transition planning process, specifically regarding the importance of parent expectations for positive post-secondary outcomes.

Published on Jun 8, 2016 on youtube by, Stephanie Cawthon, Carrie Lou Garberoglio, Jackie Caemmerer, Mark Bond, and Erica Wendel.